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FAULKAN '59 



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ArtE FAULKNKR HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OP NURSING 



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Zke Jaulkner Hospital 
School of Nursing 

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



Zhe faulkan 
1959 






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FOREWORD 

We, the staff of the 1959 
"Faulkati," hope that be- 
tween these two covers we 
have captured and bound 
the unforgettable memo- 
ries spent together in study, 
service, and relaxation. 



As we are about to venture into the future, a future which holds so much for us all, 
we shall always look back to you, Faulkner, with pride and fondest recollections of the 
past three years spent with the: 



Faculty 



Seniors 



Underclassmen 



31 



Activities 



37 



Advertisements 



51 



Co-Editors 
MAIRLYN DEWAN, CAROLINE PRATT 



Business Manager 
JEAN RILEY 



Literary Manager 
MARY BLANCHARD 



Art and Photos 

SANDRA HUTCHINGS 

and 

JOAN LESSARD 



1 jM 



i 





J enter to learn 



Cest we forget 




MISS DOROTHY COTTER 




Anatomy, Physiology, Nursing 
Arts, Pharmacy, Chemistry, labs 
and lectures, extra help, unending 
patience, faithful understanding 
and sincere guidance will always 
bring to our minds the instructors 
of our preclinical year. A hearty 
thanks for a job well done. 




MRS. PATRICIA McCOY 





MRS. DOROTHY BATYLDA 



Jn Dedication 



Women's hopefulness and 
grace 

Of patience lighting up 
her face: 

And let her diadem be 
wrought 

Of kindly deed and prayer- 
ful thought, 

That ever over all distress 

May beam the light of cheer- 
fulness. 

(James Whitcomb Riley) 




MRS. PAULINE MARTIN 



To you, Mrs. Martin, we the class of 1959 dedicate our yearbook, The Faulkan. 
There is so much we could say but somehow words seem trite when it comes to 
expressing our gratitude for all you have done for us in the past three years. The 
examples you have set, the understanding, patience and wisdom you have given, 
the way you have stood by us all during our three years of training, and the friend 
you have been to each and every one of us. We can think of no other way to ex- 
press our appreciation than to dedicate this book in remembrance of the past three 
years as a small token of our thanks. 



Zhe faculty 




Many long days and hours were spent, by the 
members of the faculty, in molding us into 
nurses who will faithfully uphold the profession 
with pride and dignity. We recognize this is 
not a simple task and so with great humility we 
say thank you to those who made our dreams a 
reality. 



MISS HENRIETTA HENNIK 
Director of Nursing 




MISS KATHERINE COMEY 
Educational Director 




ty 




MISS MARY E. FALLON 

Assistant Director of 

Nursing Service 



MRS. HAZEL MURPHY 
Science Instructor 



MR. PAUL J. SPENCER 
Director of Faulkner Hospital 





MRS. PAULINE MARTIN 
Nursing Instructor 






MISS MARGARET CROWSON 
Assistant Nursing Instructor 

Mil 



MISS SHIRLEY FERGUSON 
Assistant to Nursing Instructor 



MISS RITA CAPISTRAN 
Administrative Supervisor 




MISS LYDIA CLAY 

Medical, Surgical Clinical 

Instructor 




MISS PHYLLIS REILLY 
Night Supervisor 




MRS. MARY HINES 
Health Supervisor 





MRS. JEANNE DEVOS 
Medical and Surgical Instructor 




MRS. ALICE HAMILTON 
Obstetrical Superintendent 




MISS MARY LEE SEATE 

Operating Room 

Instructor 



MISS EFTHEMIA 

PSOMIADES 

Dietician 



TO OUR PARENTS 
Dear Mom and Dad, 

As we stand here on the threshold of graduation we cannot venture forward through 
this open door until we have stopped and shared perhaps the happiest moment of our 
lives with you. Who else is more deserving, who else is so totally capable of knowing 
just how we feel but our very own mom and dad. Will you ever forget our first night 
of relief, or our first night of nights; you worked them too. You have always been with 
us in all the firsts we've experienced. There was the patient in 106, you knew him as 
well as I. 

When things were toughest and we could see no way through we could always find 
the way home. Home, where you always helped us find the way back to what only 
parents have the wisdom to see beyond the tiny hill which seemed like a mountain to 
us. There is no unity or bond that ties a girl so close to her family as that of training. 
Yet this bond is much deeper than love alone. It seems to constitute a unique under- 
standing, a deep respect for each others needs, an ever mounting faith and devotion 
for that which God alone does rule. 

Even as mature young women, about to venture out into this world of opportunity, 
we shall always remember your words of wisdom and experience - "You will never know 
as much as you know today, my child," and in our hearts we will ever harbor over- 
powering love and devotion for the two in our lives who have made our education that 
much more important. 

In tribute from, 

Your Loving Daughter. 



A 



A/ 



<wr5 



Message front Our President 



-'■"■""•»'-' f-l" II I L.L I ^ -,- 







MRS. NANCY ROBAR 



May we always be grateful to our teachers, families, and friends, who have given us so much en- 
couragement and guidance during our years of nurses' training. Let us also be grateful that we live in 
such a wonderful age of progress and opportunity. Even though it may not be our ambition to reach the 
moon, may we ever aspire to the higher things of life. "Somewhere under the stars is work which you 
alone were meant to do. Never rest until you have found it. " 



10 




ELIZABETH ANN BALLAS DALEY 
156 La grange Street 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
June 12, 1937 

"You've a manner all so mellow. . . " 

First in our class to be president and bride, Bal has led the 
way for the class of '59. "What will I do with my hair, " is a 
familiar phrase. Eating is her favorite hobby but she never 
gains a pound. Worcester State is still wondering about that 
helicopter. 

Her dry wit and casual manner will remain with us for 
many years to come. 

"Eddie My Love" 



"Betty" 



MARY ELIZABETH BLANCHARD 
125 Kent Street 
Scituate, Mass. 
May 23, 1938 

"So filled with wildest glee, yet so serene. " 

Pixie of the class - that's our Mare. If anyone needs a 
lesson in how to fix flat tires Mary is the one to see. A 
perfect hostess in every way. Which is it, Mare, a boat or a 
ship? 

She will most be remembered for her mischievous eyes 
and understanding ways. 

"Moonglow " 




"Mare" 



II 




JOAN PRISCILLA BOURGAULT 
5 Glendale Terrace 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

"The mind is not the heart. " 

Silence is oftimes golden, is our description of Joanie. 
Only one so petite could live in room 64. "I'm smiling now, " 
is what we hear most often. 

With a heart so full of gold and a friendliness so true surely 
only the good can be awaiting Joanie. 



"Joanie" 

BERYL ANN BROWN 
50 Carley Street 
Westwood, Mass. 
June 21, 1938 

"I laughed inside, and only cranked the faster. " 

Big Bopper the second. Where would Beryl be if radios hadn't 
been invented. "Shall we dance?" - To the "King and I, " of 
course. Happy go lucky Beryl can be found in the kitchen or 
asleep in bed. Remember study hours and those numerous 
alarm clocks! A joke with every coke, a lover of nature, 
possessor of the wanderlust. 

Such a light heart has made Berl an essential part of the 
class of '59. "No Other Love" 





"Beryl" 

KATHERINE RHODA CHADWELL 
96 Stetson Avenue 
Swampscott, Mass. 
February 21, 1938 

"With innocence of song and childish chat. " 

From long to short hair hasn't changed Kay a bit to us. 
Through the ups and downs she has always managed to keep her 
head above sea level. A true conversationalist, an ardent TV 
fan. Always ready for fun, that's our Kay. 

A truly fine-mixer with a contagious laugh will more than 
aid Kay in all her future endeavors. 

"It's Just a Matter Of Time" 



"Kay" 



JANICE MURIEL COTILLO 
368 South Street 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire 

"I will omit no opportunity. " 

Sugar and spice, everything nice, is our little queen, from 
New Hampshire. "Hi, kids, what are you doing?' It's hard to 
believe so much energy and spirit could be in one sole in- 
dividual. New Hampshire has much to gain from this little one. 

Our hearts go out to such a warm and genuine girl. 

"Love is a Many Splendored Thing" 





"Jan" 
SYLVIA ANN CROPPER 

121 Leighton Road 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

May 27, 1939 

"She must ever be advancing some new prank, and laughing 
and dancing. " 

"Bless you all, " will ring through the corridors of Chapin 
House for years to come. How could we ever have passed our 
finals without your "blessing. " "Down among the redmen, 
feathers in our head men - pow-wow. " Who is it this month, 
Silk? Minus twenty in less than three months. Given any I.M. 's 
lately? 

So gay at heart, so earnest in nature makes Silkie the love 
of our life. "Golden Days" 






"Silkie" 

MARILYN ANN DEWAN 
150 Lasell Street 
West Roxbury, Mass 
February 28, 1939 

"True hearted friend of all true friendliness. " 

"I'm Newport bound, by hook or by crook. " A harder 
worker is hard to find. An ardent "B" - Medical fan - nights! 
"Shape up or ship out, but please pay your class dues before 
you go. " Ready and willing is Mai's byword be it at work or at 
play. 

A smile so true, a will so strong marks Marilyn as a sure 
success. 

"Every Day of My Life" 




"Mal- 



IS 




PRINCESS VICTORIA FLEAGAL EVERTON 
R. D. 1 
Friedens, Pean. 

"Forbids all mockery, though quaint she is. " 

Pat brings royalty to our class from Pennsylvania. So little, 
yet with so very much to offer. Her Pennsylvania accent and 
precise manner leaves us with much to be awed.. Almost a 
constant tap can be heard from Prin's room as she types away 
for the man in her life. Another June bride. 

So loyal a friend, so righteous in living. 



"Pat" 

JO-ALTA HADLEY 
22 Channing Street 
Wollaston, Mass. 
June 24, 1936 

"But time passed by in a strange disguise. " 

A transfer from Quincy. Bill dominates most of her spare 
time. Wedding bells in June. Weekends at Halifax, Oh those 
sparkling green eyes and a laugh so hearty. 

An addition to our class who will long be remembered. 




"Moments to Remember" 





"Joddie" 

ELAINE FRANCES HARHEN 
100 Whiting Street 
Hingham, Mass. 
May 5, 1938 

"So hot of heart and wild of spirit. " 

A tan at any time of the year, that's our Harry. Beautiful, 
beautiful brown eyes. How's progress, Elaine? A trip to Europe 
a year to the day after graduation. Always ready for a good 
time - in rain or shine. 

Her sparkling personality will retain many fond memories 
in years to come. 

"Summertime" 



14 



'Harry" 



SANDRA HUTCHINGS 
9 High Street 
Yarmouth, Maine 
May 30, 1938 

"You sing a song of rare delight. . . " 

Energy at its utmost; our " Gypsy Rose Lee. " Rain or shine 
she can be found walking at a very fast pace. "Anyone for 
Brighams ? " 

Hutch has spread her bubbling personality and charm from 
the shores of Maine to sunny Bermuda. Trade mark! Have 
R.N. will travel. 

"Island In The Sun" 





RUTH MARIE JAMESON TYLER 
22 Greter Road 
Roslindale, Mass. 
July 23, 1938 

"The storm of love has burst at last. " 

Through thick and thin she has shown her Vermont per- 
severance. "Hi, hon - affectionate and warm hearted Ruthie 
was chief chauffeur at the Brigham. Those lonesome trips to 
N. H. have been eliminated since she became Mrs. 

Our hearts go out to Jamy for the glow she has added to 
our lives. 

"Please Love Me Forever" 



"Jamy 



PATRICIA RUTH KELLEHER 
50 Central Street 
Mansfield, Mass. 
October 28, 1938 



"Mixed from a bowl of sky blue dreams and sea green facts. . 

True or false it's hard to say what mischief lies behind 
those sparkling eyes. Petite Pat in her reserved manner has 
supplied us with many a laugh. "Tennis, anyone?" 

A perfect lady in every way. 

"Why Was IBorn?" 







"Pat" 



15 




JACQUELYN MAY KEPPLER 
334 Granville Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 
August 21, 1936 

"O noble, true and sure and lovable. . . " 

A gift from the African missions is what we await from 
Kep. Bill plays an important part in Jackie's life and a more 
perfect couple you'll never find. Jackie can always be found 
somewhere between E. T.S. and Faulkner. 

A mature young woman with high ideals makes Jack one of 
the most understanding and patient members of our class. 



"True Love" 



"Jackie" 

BARBARA ANN LEACH 
Crescent Avenue 
Falmouth, Mass. 
April 16, 1938 

"As a rosebud myth, in dreaminess. . . " 

Falmouth at 5 A.M. after the senior prom - what a ride! 
How about a surprise shower for your cousin. Barbie? 

A kind way about her, and patient too. How long was it 
you had to wait before you got to see Danny in Tennessee - 
that was another good ride. 

Wedding chimes after graduation will be the beginning of 
a long happy life for Barbie and Danny. 

"Until The 12th Of Never" 





"Barbie" 

JOAN MARIE LESSARD 
5 Hillside Street 
Winthrop, Mass. 
October 18, 1938 

"Love is a smoke raised with the fumes of sighs. " 

"You'll never guess, you'll just never guess, " echoes the 
corridors in joyful squeals. Kettledrums, the pops, Yogie 
bear, and onion rings all wrapped up into one vivacious blonde 
could characterize no other "I want my Maypo. " 

Her versatility and overpowering personality make her a 
must in any society. 

"I've Grown Accustomed to His Face" 



16 



"Joannie" 



GLORIA LITCHFORD 
8 Plympton Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 
September 20, 1928 

"Gifted, loved and praised. . . " 

One of our best loved seniors, "Glo" is a transfer student 
whose real love of people and nursing has made her an asset 
to the class. 

Never an unkind word or thought from Gloria. Her motto 
seems to be "if you can't say something good about someone 
don't say anything, " 

"Autumn Leaves" 






"Glo" 

DOROTHY EVELYN LORD 
Willow Avenue 
Little Compton, R. I. 
August 6, 1936 

"Fair girl, fond wife and dear young mother. . . " 

One union split into three states. A transfer in her senior 
year to make our class complete. Daily letters and week- 
end trips have made long days shorter. 

Dot's poise and maturity has yet to be surpassed. Her 
courage to attain her goal has set an example for us all. 

"Third Man Theme" 



"Dot" 

SANDRA DENISE MANN 
121 Traffrail Road 
Quincy, Mass. 
September 22, 1938 

"A something quiet and subdued. . . " 

Sandy, have you had any blind dates lately? Neatness 
personified - "top drawer, left hand side, in the corner." On 
a constant campaign to gain weight our gal is bound to lose. 

A few words with much wisdom comes from Sandy. Her 
quiet ways leave us with much to admire. 

"April Love" 




"Sandy" 



17 




THERESA ANN McQUADE 
496 Washington Street 
Dedham, Mass. 
January 10, 1939 

"Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber. . . " 

Not a care in the world, happy from day to day. Terry is 
at home in Canada or at "Pops. " 

That beautiful new car may take her many miles away 
but her laughter will remain with us through the years. 

"To Know Him Is To Love Him" 



"Terry" 

FREDERIC A ELAINE MILLER 
44 Westview Terrace 
West wood, Mass. 

"With the most noble blood of all this world. . . " 

"Which Miller are you.F. , S. , or J. ? Once distinguished, 
never forgotten. Did you ever get to see that little house in 
back of Silkie's? Complexion of moonglow, a bundle of gleam, 
best describes the memories of our Freddie we will carry 
through the years to come. 

"True Love" 





"Freddy" 

JOAN FRANCES MILLER 
599 River Street 
Haverhill, Mass. 
March 24, 1938 

"Sweet little face, so full of slumber. . . " 

Good things come in small packages is a familiar phrase 
but oh, so true when it comes to describing Joanie. "I just 
have to have my sleep," is what we often hear. From '56 to 
'59 our Joan has remained the same. Her impish expression has 
us all wondering what she'll do next. 

Joan's sincerity and understanding ways will go down in the 
history of our minds as a true example of young womanhood. 

"Somewhere Over the Rainbow" 



18 



"Joannie" 



SHIRLEY LORRAINE MILLER ROBERTS 
32 Charming Street 
Quincy, Mass. 
June 25, 1937 

"There is a singer everyone has heard. " 

Where there's a guitar there's Shirl. Many's the night our 
gal has spent entertaining us with her hillbilly roll. If not at 
work then she can be found with Ken. Another May bride we 
add to the list. .Earth doesn't provide enough good forShirl to do. 

With such fortitude and strength and the will to strive forward 
she cannot help but come out on top. 

"Warm" 





"Shirl" 

JUDITH SUZAN MITCHELL 
166 Clifton Avenue 
Brocton, Mass. 
January 17, 1938 

"Laughing eyes of limped blue. . . like glad waters running over. ' 

"Don't tell anyone, - But!, " are the words most heard. Tall 
tales run freely with Mitch around. Now tell us, Judy, what 
really happened to the turtle? Mechanics like a puppet on a 
suing. Most often seen and heard rumbling in her Volks. 

A personality no one can claim but Mitch makes her loved 
by all. 

"Beautiful Dreamer" 



"Mitch" 

CAROLINE ELIZABETH PRATT 
'214 Billings Street 
North Quincy, Mass. 
February 12, 1937 

"Constant as the northern star. . . " 

"Seriously though, " is the byword and "actually, " follows 
as a close second. Pratt has been an active member in our class 
and student government for the past three years. What about 
those "platonic relationships?" "Anyone for coffee, " is the 
password. 

One of the many "mothers" in our class Caroline is always 
ready with a sympathetic ear. 

"Fascination" 




"Chick" 



19 




JEAN TELFORD RILEY 
7 Lombard Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 
April 11, 1938 

"A song of long ago. . . " 

Miss County Cork of Faulkner Hospital. Rile can be found 
most usually looking for daisies - in gardens, on hats - wher- 
ever they're found. "This is Miss Riley calling. " Jean's main 
ambition is to work days. Had any conjunctivitis lately? 

With her Irish eyes and roguish smile, Jean's love tor people 
will take her far. 

"Drifting and Dreaming" 



"Rile" 

NANCY MAE ROBAR 
501 W. Washington Street 
Hansen, Mass. 
June 6, 1935 

"So brave she was, and good, in worth of womanhood. " 

No other feet could fill her shoes. As cute as a button, a 
way all her own best describes our senior class president. "He 
bought me a present, " can often be heard. A willing worker, 
a steadfast friend has made Nancy a most loved member of 
our class. A career man, Nance? 

"Only You" 





"Nance" 

JUDITH ANNE SLACK 
Edgartown, Mass. 
August 29, 1938 

"One level higher than the earth below. " 

What a lucky girl. How many of us get a dozen roses, rec- 
ords by the ton, and a diamond, all from the same handsome 
fellow. Martha's Vineyard - is her home. How's that ferry 
running, Jud? Wedding bells will be ringing soon after grad- 
uation and we wish Judy and Ken every happiness. 

"Now and for Always" 



20 



"Judy" 



CAROL SNYDER 
94 Vine Street 
Reading, Mass. 
July 14, 1938 

"A peaceful life just toil and rest." 

With a twinkle in her eyes and a song on her lips, Snyde 
has provided us with many a laugh. Have you done any ap- 
pendectomies lately? A search party arises when Carol can't 
be found. 

In her jovial manner and carefree way Carol will long ring 
through the years of all our minds. 

"Love Is a Many Splendored Thing" 





Snyd" 



PATRICIA ANN SULLIVAN 
176 Garden Street 
Fall River, Mass. 
February 11, 1932 

"I have a mind myself. . . " 

Sully, our female casanova has kept many of us on pins 
and needles waiting for the final blow to a fantastic story. 
Never a dull moment with Pat around. Her conversational 
ability has no takers in competition. Samba, Tango, or 
Rumba, anyone? 

With her overwhelming wit and power to excel we are sure 
she will have no trouble in the years to come. 

"Accentuate the Positive" 



"Sully" 

JANICE EMERSON TOHER 
36 Blake Street 
Newtonville, Mass. 
March 8, 1938 

"To attain the highest good. . . " 

"Hi, there" is a familiar phrase from Jan on her way in or 
out. Toher seems to be always on the go. "The meeting will 
now come to order" As president of Student Association she 
was outstanding. 

Jan's poise and graciousness will carry her far on the ladder 
of success. 

"Dream" 




"Jan" 



21 



Class 



On September 5, 1956, almost three years to date 

Forty youngsters entered Chapin to learn their fate. 

There were tall ones, short ones, skinny ones and plump ones 

Page boys, feather cuts, pixies and buns. 

Each however looked the same in the face, 

With eyes which asked, "Is this to be my base? " 

Big sisters smiled in a knowing way, 

For only they knew the price that we must pay. 

Then all of a sudden it seemed all were gone. 

Alone each felt; Moms and Dads had drifted along. 

To our rooms we were shown with enough luggage to 

choke a horse, 
Of which clothes, stuffed animals, and fodti 

were the source. 
Unpacked we did in a hesitant way, asking ourselves 

how we ever got here 
For in all our plans for our chosen career we forgot to 

include Mom and Dad wouldn't be near. 
To supper we traveled like a herd of starved cattle 
Engaging in what is known as girl's idle prattle. 
A talent show was our next new endeavor. 
We found that our class was really quite clever. 
Duckwalking, bedstripping, bowing to upperclassmen 
Was all a part of initiation from them. 
Our first night at Chapin we'll never forget, 
Not a one of us slept; This you can bet. 
Next morning at 6:30 we all did arise, 
Our career had begun is what we surmised. 
The classroom awaited with books to be read 
"All those in six months?, " is what we then said. 
"All those and then some, " came the voice of our leader, 
Mrs. Martin of course, this is how we did meet her. 
Introductions to courses, for now we must work 
We had a job that we just couldn't shirk. 
For the next six months oh how we did study 
For hours at night, alone in a group or with a buddy. 
Then came finals just before capping 



History 



Not much time could be found for napping. 

How we would pass them we weren't quite sure. 

It seemed to be more then we could endure. 

But passed them we did and to our surprise 

Up the aisle of capping we did rise. 

With blessings from our parents and friends 

We received our caps to tie up loose ends. 

Two weeks vacation was upon us at last. 

As soon as it started it seemed it had passed. 

Back to classes and work we did march, 

With bibs and caps which were really quite starched. 

The next six months was spent mostly on days. 

With relief and nights next to come our way. 

The D. K. , O. R. and Obs were the following stops 

With affiliations in sight to be our future hops. 

From a plain white cap to two wing bands we flew 

In the fall of 57 with thirty two as our crew. 

To C. H. and Worchester with a trunk load of ownings 

From many were heard anxiety moanings. 

Peter Bent Brigham for only six weeks 

Gave us the chance to do nursing at its peak. 

With two and a half years stacked up behind us 

There were six months left to fly by like dust. 

Senior classes began, six weeks to a section 

And along with all this came senior election. 

Vacations began and weddings of classmates 

While others began their setting of dates. 

A shower was given for those being married 

All of us there and oh how we tarried. 

The summer flew by with only weeks 'til graduation 

That day we'll remember 'til the end of creation. 

Our mission accomplished, our goal now attained, 

The memories of training, our standards maintained. 

The joys and hardships we've gone through together 

Will be with us always 'til the day before never. 

So to Faulkner we hail for three years of living 

Where we learned in this world there's more joy in giving. 



23 



Clast 



April 17. 1969 
2 14 Ocean Drive 
Honolulu, Hawaii 

Miss Sylvia Cropper 
Director of Nurses 
Faulkner Hospital, 
Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Dear Silkie, 

In response to your fecent request to locate the various members of the class of 1959 
for our ten year progress report I decided to take a trip around the world in thirty-one 
days. I never dreamed I'd be able to locate so many in such a short space of time. 
The variety of occupations was astounding! Starting out from Hawaii on a Friday morn- 
ing for Alaska, I found Joan Lessard as a stewardess, on the very plane I was boarding. 
She looked terrific with the navy blue uniform and beautiful California tan. Upon ar- 
rival in Alaska I was greeted by Carol Snyder who is doing pediatrics for the ice-bound 
Eskimos. We had a dinner of blubber and polar bear meat. Think I'll stick to steak, 
thank you. From Alaska I proceeded down to San Francisco where I found Kay Chad- 
well, R.N. , B.S. , M.D. , head of the Golden Gate Anesthesia Department. Kay is lov- 
ing every minute of it. From California I went to New Mexico by train, and much to 
my surprise I ran into Gloria Litchford who is now teaching Nursing Arts to the young 
Mexicans, Traveling up the map a bit 1 stopped over in Arizona to see Judy Mitchell 
who is now a school nurse in a bustling ranch community. Judy has to improvise quite 
a bit but after our home nursing course it is quite easy, she says. In Louisiana I found 
Caroline Pratt doing psychiatric nursing in Louisiana State Sanitorium. She is planning 
to enter some of her patients in the Mardi Gras festivities this year to show the progress 
being made. Down in Panama I came across Dottie Lord and Nancy Robar with their 
husbands basking in the sun and giving L. P. N. 's course in English. Down Cuba way I 
found Jody Hadley as private scrub nurse for Fidel Castro. On a stop over in Bermuda I 
had dinner with Sandi Hutchings, R.N. , who is now head of all public health on the 
island. It's a big assignment but Hutch is doing a great job. From the sunny shores of fan- 
tastic Bermuda I boarded an ocean liner for Europe. Much to my amusement I found 
Elaine Harhen on her way to Paris for her long awaited vacation. We had a great chance 
to reminisce. We arrived in England just a few hours later. These jet propelled liners 



24 



Prophecy 



are fabulous for people who want to take a long trip in a short period of time. England 
led us to Betty Ballas Daleys' house. Betty is head of the welfare department of the 
Commonwealth of England. Up in Ireland I saw those two smiling eyes of Jean Riley, 
who is now a missionary nurse, Jean loves the work and the people all love Jean. While 
passing through Sweden I found Judy Slack, Night Supervisor in the Kings' Hospital. 
Coming down to Germany, I looked up Joanie Miller, who is running a medical aid 
station for refugees. Stopping in on Pat Fleagal in Holland was perhaps the most amusing 
stop of all. Pat's latest endeavor is teaching the Dutch nurses how to tip-toe around the 
wards in their wooden shoes. Freddy Miller turned up in Sweden running a first aid 
station in the Alps. Freddy claims business is boomingl I decided to jaunt down to 
Monaco and guess who I found -- Terry McQuade as governess to Princess Grace's child- 
ren by day and gambler by night. I guess you might say I splurged a little, but not in 
vain, by taking a cruise up the Mediterranean. I found Jan Toher now head nurse of 
research for the Esso Standard Oil Company. Of course, Silkie, I realize this letter 
should be and probably will be published somewhere, however, please exclude the next 
bit of information. Pat Kelleher is reported to be working behind the iron curtain. She 
is working for the U.S. Government on some secret mission, to do with W.H.O. Sandi 
Mann is working in China now with her husband, who is now a five star general for Uncle 
Sam. I visited Australia and found Jackie Keppler with her husband doing missionary 
work together. They plan to return to the states in 1985. Shirley Miller is doing con- 
stant care down in the Fiji Islands. The constant care is her family of seven. Guess 
that's enough to keep anyone constantly busy. I arrived back on the east coast only 
ten days ago. On stepping off the plane I decided to look up Beryl Brown who is head 
nurse on ward 28 at Childrens Hospital. Traveling back over the U.S.I stopped to see 
Jan Cotillo, now head of the A. N. A. and Mary Blanchard, Director of Nurses at New 
York University. Pat Sullivan was out delivering a baby when I reached Kentucky. 
Her secretary told me business had been flourishing this year. Barbie Leach is doing 
frontier nursing in Tennessee with her husband and four children. Last but far from 
least while waiting for my plane to take me back home I ran across Joanie Bourgault 
who is now editor of the A.J.N, and making headlines with all her stimulating edito- 
rials. 

Well, Silkie, I guess you might say mission accomplished, and all are well, making 
the headlines. I am signing off now, this Hawaiian sun is just scorching today. See you 
next May at the reunion. 

Sincerely, 
P. 



fjAXAJyiL^ 




25 



das-* 



We, the class of 1959, of the Faulkner Hospital School of Nursing, being of sound mind and 
body do hereby declare our last will and testament. 

To Faulkner we leave 1095 days of gratitude and thanks. 

To Miss Hennik we leave our deepest appreciation for the knowledge and skill she has in- 
stilled in us. 

To Miss Comey we leave an affiliation plan guaranteed to run according to plan. 

To the Faculty we leave an automatic kleenex dispenser. 

To our parents we leave inexpressible appreciation. 

To the Supervisors we leave an electronic brain guaranteed to answer all questions. 

To Dr. Stein we leave our fondest thanks for three; good health, warm friendship, and 
sincere interest. 

To Mrs. Himes we leave three years accumulation of monthly weights. 

To the Head Nurses we leave clean utility rooms and empty laundry bags. 

To the Doctors we leave an automatic front page D.O.B. stamper. 

To the Residents we leave a year's supply of ball point pens guaranteed to write. 

To the Underclassmen we leave white shoe polish, a year's supply of hairnets and 
ironwear hose. 

To the Medical Students we leave the memories of midnight supper. 

To Mrs. Cruise we leave a new tea server to replace the one that was fixed by maintenance. 

To the Housemothers and Maids we leave the dreams of an answering service. 

To Mrs. Martin we leave this book as a memory of her years at Faulkner. 

Joan Miller leaves her height to Betsy Newell. 

Pat Sullivan leaves her conversational abilities to Dianne Buckley. 

Sandy Hutchings leaves her dancing partner to the hinges. 

Joan Bourgault leaves her corner room on the fourth floor to anyone small enough to fit 
into it. 

Barbie Leach leaves for Tennessee. 

Marilyn Dewan and Mary Blanchard leave their messy room to Faye Anderson. 

Jodie Hadley leaves her extra pounds to Ann Day. 



26 



Will 



Caroline Pratt leaves her uniforms to Maxine Pratt, who always gets them anyway. 

Kay Chadwell leaves her straight hair to Sally Webb. 

Beryl Brown leaves the singing to Carolyn Baker. 

Sandi Mann leaves emaciated. 

Judy Mitchell leaves her spaghetti legs to anyone willing to take over. 

Pat Kelleher leaves her tall tales to Priscilla Tighe. 

Joan Marie Lessard leaves - Cha - Cha - Cha. 

Jackie Keppler leaves her smile to Maureen Gibbs. 

Betty Ballas leaves her ability to sleep to Nancy Bickford. 

Jean Riley leaves her love for hats to Melen Machado. 

Freddi Miller leaves her hairnets to Joan McCarthy. 

Jan Cotillo leaves her ability to ask questions to Pat Walker. 

Jan Toher leaves the memory of Atlantic City to? ? ? 

Judy Slack leaves her meticulous nature to Jeanna Pleadwell. 

Gloria Litchford leaves her perseverance to Joan Moreng. 

Princess Fleagal leaves her royalty to Pat Lynch. 

Nancy Robar leaves her title "Class Mother" to Chris Pakatar. 

Silkie Cropper leaves her "quiet ways" to Marilyn Keswick. 

Dotty Lord leaves to join her husband. 

Terry McQuade leaves her laughter to Carolyn Forbes. 

Ruthie Jameson leaves her warm friendliness to Sue Briggs. 

Carol Snyder leaves her good nature to Judy McCannon. 

Elaine Harhen leaves her sunlamp to Sue Jenner. 

Shirley Miller leaves her babysitting jobs to Ann Henrich. 

Signed: .\stox>«*A^ Jb^cX^A^*<-^J> 



Witnessed: 



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27 



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Our Second Year 



28 




Our Third Year 



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FAULKNER HOSPITAL PLEDGE AND CREED 

Reverently do I pledge myself to the wholehearted service of 
those whose care is entrusted to this hospital. To that end I will strive 
in the fulfillment of my duties holding secret whatsoever I may learn 
touching upon the lives of the sick. I acknowledge the dignity of the 
cure of disease and the safe-guarding of health in which no act is 
menial or inglorious. I will walk in upright faithfulness and obe- 
dience to those under whose guidance I am to work, and I pray for 
patience, kindness and understanding in the holy ministry of broken 
bodies. 




0\ 



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Underclassmen 



CLASS OF 1960 




Junior Class plus 20 




The middle men of Faulkner Hospital. Your turn 
next year kids. A truly active class. The first to at- 
tempt a dance in the Rec room. It's hard to find them 
all together at the same time. Affiliations, kids? Oh, 
your stories bring back old memories. We'll see you all 
in 1960. 



I 32 



Enjoy yourself! 




CLASS OF 1961 




Freshman Class 




There must be a beginning to all 
worthwhile things. If you only knew 
how much you remind us of ourselves 
only three years ago. A quiet class 
when you first encounter them but give 
two or three minutes and then watch 
out. The first to use Faulkner Barn 
and rumor has it quite successfully at 
that, right, kids? Socially inclined, 
that's our probies. 

The next two years will pass right 
by without you hardly realizing it. 
Always remember where there is a will, 
there is a way. 



33 







Student Government Officers 




34 



Student Council 



Affiliation 



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Hale House 




M If! 







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Peter Bent 


Brigham 


Nurses Home 



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Gardner House 




Worcester State Hospital 




Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 




Childrens Hospital 



35 



WHAT IS A STUDENT NURSE? 



Student nurses are found everywhere, underneath, on top of, run- 
ning around, jumping over, or slithering past patient's beds. Doctors 
yell at them, head nurses criticize them, interns tolerate them, resi- 
dents overlook them, and patients love them. 

A student nurse is courage under a cap, a smile in snowy white, 
strength in a starched skirt, energy that is endless, the best of young 
womanhood, a modern Florence Nightingale. Just when she is gain- 
ing prestige and poise, she drops a glass, breaks a syringe or steps on a 
doctor's foot. 

A student nurse is like a composite, she eats like a team of hun- 
gry interns and works like the whole nursing staff put together. She 
has the speed of a gazelle, the strength of an ox, the quickness of a 
cat, the endurance of a flagpole sitter, and the abilities of Florence 
Nightingale, Linda Richards, and Clara Barton rolled into one blue 
uniform. 

To the head nurse she has the stability of mush, the fleetness of 
a snail, the mentality of a mule and is held together by starch, ad- 
hesive tape and strained nerves. To an alumnae, she never will work 
hard, carry more trays, make more beds, or scrub on more operations 
than her predecessors. 

A student nurse likes days off, boys her own age, the O.R. , af- 
filiations, certain doctors, pretty clothes, her roommate, mom and 
dad. She is not much on working 3:30-12, days off with classes, alarm 
clocks, getting up for roll call, or eating corned beef every Tuesday. 

No one else looks forward so much to days off or so little to 
working 3:30-12 on week ends. No one else can get so much pleasure 
from straightening a wrinkled sheet, or wetting a pair of parched lips. 
No one else can cram into one little head the course of a disease, 
the bones composing the pelvis, what to do when a patient goes into 
shock, how to insert a Cantor tube (usually at 3 a.m.) plus the ten top 
tunes of the hit parade. 

A student nurse is a wonderful creature, you can criticize her, but 
you can't discourage her. You can hurt her feelings but you can't 
make her quit. Might as well admit it, whether you are a head nurse, 
doctor, alumnae, or a patient, she is your personal representative of 
the hospital, your living symbol of faith and loving care. 







Activities 





Between classes 



We live here 



I 38 






Working for our caps was perhaps the hardest task we 
had ever endeavored. Hours of lecture, labs with the cats, 
frogs and petri dishes, quizzes, exams, study hours and last 
but far from least were finals and that midnight oil ! ! I 





"Almost finished? 



"Should we}" 




"What a riot" 



"Try channel 7 



"Am I red yet?" 



The rec room versus the roof, where shall we go first? Many a "Florida" 
tan was acquired on the roof, and many a record session enjoyed in the rec 
room. Ping-pong, TV, cokes, peanut butter and crackers all part of our 
leisure hours. "Anyone want a Sundae?" Walks to Brighams . . .rain or shine. 





Santa's annual kept us all guessing who was under 
the pillows and snowy white beard. Big sisters, little 
sisters, gifts galore, tops in fashion, tokens of jest 
for the faculty, kiss for Santa refreshments, singing, 
and holiday spirit all tend to make this a night to 
remember. 



"Tell Santa what you want, Ruthie?' 




Goldfish, Jean?" 





"A job well done, Santa O'Hara" 

■ ■ 





Flag of truce 



One of many rides 



"No one asked if you wanted one" 




Seven heads are better than one 



Was it really funny? 




B.U. or Faulkner? 



A little extra help 




That Pepsodent smile 



The casual hours spent to- 
gether will long be remember- 
ed by all. A keen sense of 
humor, good sportsmanship, 
and the ability to laugh when 
it was your turn to hit the 
showers was a must in our 
society. 



A true South Sea Islander 




42 



"Oh well, I was going to take one anyway. 



'What brand do you smoke, pardner?' 




All pyramids aren't found in Egypt! ! ! 




Coffee served anytime 



Utter exhaustion 




Between 10 and 10:30 after study 
hours, head for the kitchen, pile 
into the nearest room where there 
was homemade "goodies. " Never 
could find an empty shower or tub 
until 10:35. The end of a long day. 
Next stop between the covers. 



Always room for one more 




Fourth floor versus 



the third floor 



43 





Faulkner Chorus 




Senior class officers 




Dance lessons for no 



The senior year, full of reunions from affiliations, relief shift, night duty, the prom, picnics, 
graduation, and fond farewells to those who have made our three years at Faulkner possible. 



I 44 



MISTLETOE BALL 




Seniors 

Mistletoe Ball, the Student Government 
Christmas dance. A festive night for all 
concerned. Every one dressed in their finest, 
a far cry from the blues and whites. Sup- 
ported by alumnae, faculty, and the doctors 
and staff. A Merry time was had by all. 




A short intermission 




Seniotl 





"La Bella Notta," or beautiful night as it was 
so perfectly named. Ask anyone who attended 
just how beautiful it was. To add to the radiance 
of the evening our own Jan Cotillo reigned as 
queen and a more appropriate and deserving 
queen has yet to be crowned. Dancing to the 
music of Marchard and his orchestra in the State 
suite of the Sheraton Plaza provided a most 
memorable evening for us all. Following the 
prom found many departing for destinations such 
as Steubens, Marshfield, Bilaricka, and old Cape 
Cod. 

A night long awaited, a night long to be re- 
membered. 



■Prom 



* t***r\ £3 




BELOW - TOP ROW, left to right: Judy Slack, Gloria Litchford, Freddie Miller, Jody Hadley, Jean Rielly, 
Sandy Mann, Jackie Keppler, Nancy Robar, Betty Ballas Daly, Ruthie Jamison Tyler, Carol Snyder. 
BOTTOM ROW, left to right: Caroline Pratt, Silkie Cropper, Barbara Leach, Jan Cotillo, Joan Lessard, 
Jan Toher, Kay Chadwell, Dot Lord. 




GOLD STAR SPONSORS 



JULIUS ABRAMSON, M. D. 

MARK AISNER, M. D. 

APAHOUSER CORP. OF NEW ENGLAND 

FRANKLIN G. BALCH, JR. , M. D. 

JOHN R. BARRY, M. D. 

M. K. BARTLETT, M. D. 

BASIL E. BARTON, M. D. 

HOLLIS G. BATCHELDER, M. D. 

MARCUS W. BERMAN, M. D. 

LOUIS L. BLUESTEIN, M. D. 

CHARLES D. BONNER, M. D. 

PHILLIPS L. BOYD, M. D. 

ERNEST A. BRAGG, JR. , M. D. 

DR. AND MRS. 

THOMAS E. CAUANAUGH, JR. 
THOMAS W. CHRISTOPHER, M. D. 
S. CLIVE COHEN, M. D. 
CONSOLIDATED MACHINE 

CORPORATION 
JOHN H. CRANDON, M. D. 
DAVID DAVIS, M. D. 
DEDHAM MEDICAL ASSOCIATES 
ROBERT J. DIGNAM, M. D. 
ARTHUR J. DRISCOLL COMPANY 
CHRISTOPHER J. DUNCAN, M. D. 
H. G. DUNPHY, M. D. 
FRANCIS X. EARLS, M. D. 
EDWARD A. EDWARDS, M. D. 
BRUCE C. FLEMING, M. D. 
DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH GIBBONS 
RAYMOND W. GIBBS, M. D. 
EDWARD HAMLIN, JR. , M. D. 
LOUIS HERMANSON, M. D. 
J. AARON HERSCHFUS 
HOLMAN, O. D. BAKER CO. , INC. 
ROBERT P. JOPLIN, M. D. 
KERMIT H. KATZ, M. D. 
LAMCO CHEMICAL CO. , INC. 
IRVING M. MADOFF, M. D. 



DR. STEPHEN P. MALLETT 
MEIGS ASSOCIATES 
GEORGE F. MILLER, M. D. 
WILLIAM CURRY MOLONEY, M. D. 
THOMAS J. MONAHAN, JR. , M. D. 
DR. AND MRS. ROBERT W. MULLINS 
WILLIAM R. McAUSLAND, JR. , M. D. 
KEVIN J. McCARTY, M. D. 

william j. Mcdonald, m. d. 
eugene f. Mcdonough, m. d. 

JOHN M. McGOWAN, M. D. 
LOUIS H. NASON, M. D. 
ARTHUR S. NEWMAN, M. D. 
WILLIAM T. O'CONNELL, M. D. 
EDWARD O'HARA, M. D. 
W. RICHARD OTTLER, M. D. 
ROBERT E. OLER, M. D. 
OVERHOTT HORACE, CLINIC 
MELVIN OSBORNE, M. D. 
B. H. ROBINSON, M. D. 
AUGUSTINE T. ROGERS, M. D. 
WILLIAM ROUNDSVILLE, M. D. 
JOHN J. SACCO, M. D. 
JOSEPH H. SCHAFFER, M. D. 
ISADORE SCHWARTZ, M. D. 
PAUL B. SHAPIRO, M. D. 
ROBERT SHAPIRO, M. D. 
CHARLES P. SHELDON, M. D. 
EDWARD L. SLEEPER, D. D. S. 
JOHN W. SPEELMAN, M. D. 
GEORGE W. B. STARKEY, M. D. 
HAROLD J. STEIN, M. D. 
HOWARD M. TRAFTON, M. D. 
JOHN C. TRAKAS, M. D. 
R. WALKER, M. D. 
WILLIAM F. WALSH, M. D. 
DAVID WEINTRAUB, M. D. 
H. ROBERT WISE, M. D. 
EDWARD L. YOUNG, M. D. 



SILVER STAR SPONSORS 



Harold Bengloff, M. D. 
Hathorn P. Brown, M. D. 
Leo B. Burgin, M. D. 
Joseph H. Burnett, M. D. 
John B. Cadigan, Jr., M. D. 
Walter H. Caskey, M. D. 
Clifton Crane, M. D. 
Doucett, The Stamp Man 
Roger T. Doyle, M. D. 
R. A. Draper, M. D. 
Richard J. Gorman, M. D. 
Barton E. Hamilton, M. D. 
James Harrison, M. D. 
WalterS. Kerr, Jr., M.D.- 
Aaron H. Levin, M. D. 
Keith Merrill, Jr., M.D. 
William V. McDermott, Jr., M.D. 
Curtis Prout, M. D. 
Francis M. Rackermann, M.D. 
Lawrence Saxon, M. D. 
George H. Sweetman, M. D. 
Kurt H. Thoma, M. D. 




«' jmK 



/ 




/ depart to serve 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 



PARENT TEACHERS STUDENT 
ASSOCIATION 



v 



Mr... 





COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



PAUL D. OSBORNE 
DESK COMPANY 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



CROTTY BROTHERS, INC 



JAMAICA UPHOLSTERING 
COMPANY 



615 Centre Street 



Jamaica Plain 



Boston 30, Mass, 



EVERETT F. PENSHORN 
ROOFING CONTRACTOR 



185 Lamartine Street 



Jamaica Plain, Mass, 







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u* 





T. J. NOONAN COMPANY 



408 South Huntington Ave. 



Jamaica Plain, Mass, 



PARAMOUNT UNIFORM COMPANY 



577 Washington Street 



Boston 11, Mass. 



ELIOT PRESS PRINTERS 



Jamaica 4-2990 



Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE 

FAULKNER AIDE 










HHDMHMnj 




COMPLIMENTS OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 



O.B.S. DEPARTMENT 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 



OPERATING ROOM 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



E. F. MAHADY COMPANY 

Serving All New England 



225 MsgrO'Brien Highway „ , _ , _ 

_ , . , „ , , , , Medical and Surgical Supplies 

Cambridge 41, Massachusetts 

tt • -4. a innn and Equipment 

University 4 8200 



ROCK REPRODUCTIVE CENTER 



NURSEWEAR, INC. 

37 Temple Place 
Boston 11, Mass. 



CLASS OF 1 960 



CLASS OF 1961 



TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY 

"The Wo'ld'i Beit Yearbook, Are T«vlofm»de" 



XiiE FAULKNER HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 





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